Social media history could be required before buying a Gun in New York

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New gun legislation proposes that anyone who wants to buy a firearm would need to submit their social media profiles and search history for review before buying a gun in New York

The bill was drafted by state Senator Kevin Parker and Brooklyn borough President Eric Adams.

“There should be more restrictions on how guns are purchased. We should have more background checks,” Paul McQuillen, director of the Buffalo chapter of  New Yorkers Against Gun Violence, said.

He said that the NYAGC isn’t ready to back the bill yet, but he does think it could be beneficial.

“We’ve obviously seen some of the mass shooters have a social media history that should have sent red flags,” he said.

It’s not going to be easy to pass this kind of bill. James Tresmond, a gun rights lawyer, said it violates multiple constitutional rights.

“The first, the second amendment, the fifth amendment, the fourth amendment, and the 14th amendment,” Tresmond said.

Senate Bill 9191, according to WHAM, mandates “social media and search engine reviews prior to the approval of an application or renewal of a license to carry or possess a pistol or revolver; requires a person applying for a license to carry or possess a pistol or revolver or a renewal of such license to consent to having his or her social media accounts and search engine history reviewed and investigated for certain posts and/or searches over a period of 1-3 years prior to the approval of such application or renewal; defines terms.”

Under the proposed legislation, law enforcement officials could investigate “commonly known profane slurs used or biased language used to describe race, national origin, ancestry, gender, religion, disability or sexual orientation; threatening health or safety of another person, or an act of terrorism.

There should be more restrictions on how guns are purchased. We should have more background checks,” Paul McQuillen, director of the Buffalo chapter of New Yorkers Against Gun Violence, said. “We’ve obviously seen some of the mass shooters have a social media history that should have sent red flags,” he said.

The bill could be troublesome to push through as critics argue it violates multiple constitutional rights.

The legislation is currently in committee and no vote is scheduled.

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